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Outside Today co-host Julia Dimon takes us on a journey around the world. Every Thursday, "Travel Junkie" follows Julia's adventures (and misadventures) across the globe. From the snow-capped mountains of the Chilean Andes, to the fast-paced neon nightlife of Las Vegas, she'll take it to the extreme… exploring everything from unique customs, to historic sites, adrenaline-soaked activities, to bizarre foods, local budget getaways to high-end holidays. Julia also shares tips and travel advice, helpful for planning your own travel adventures, international and domestic. "Travel Junkie" goes beyond the tourist traps, venturing off-the-beaten track to bring you stories from exotic locales. For more of Julia, visit her website, Travel Junkie Julia.

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Dressed in a skin-tight wet suit, a blue helmet and a bright red life jacket, I clumsily paddled my way into the pursed mouth of a narrow limestone cave. Snarls of foamy saliva-like waves lapped up against the rock’s jagged jaws, and – as a tidal surge swept over my sit-on-top kayak shoving me towards a serrated stucco cave wall – there was nothing left to do but duck limbo-style and hope for the best.

Dressed in a skin-tight wet suit, a blue helmet and a bright red life jacket, I clumsily paddled my way into the pursed mouth of a narrow limestone cave. Snarls of foamy saliva-like waves lapped up against the rock’s jagged jaws, and – as a tidal surge swept over my sit-on-top kayak shoving me towards a serrated stucco cave wall – there was nothing left to do but duck limbo-style and hope for the best.

Typically, sea cave kayaking in this part of California’s Channel Islands involves wide open, well-lit, bat-free rock openings, but this particular cave one was more of a challenge. With a little paddling prowess and a strong partner, I narrowly avoided being smashed, face-first against a roof of barnacles. Luckily, rhinoplasty by crustacean was not on today’s itinerary but excitement sure was….

This thrill of adventure was what brought me here in the first place. Scorpion Anchorage Santa Cruz Island is the largest of the Channel Islands and is located some 20 miles from the mainland of Ventura Harbor. Home to some 2,000 species of plants and animals, of which 145 are found nowhere else in the world, the Channel Islands are said to be like the Galapagos Islands, where isolation has allowed evolution to take its course. The result is a diverse endemic wildlife unlike any other, including the island fox, the munchkin dudleya, and the bright blue Island Jay. Depending on the season and migration patterns you can also spot dolphins, sea lions, seals and grey whales swimming off shore.

Santa Barbara Adventure Company offers many outdoor adventure activities within the region, from paragliding, to rock climbing, surf lessons to this – a guided one-day sea kayaking trip through Channel Island’s caves.

Our day began when Kenji Webb, our knowledgeable tour leader and field guide, distributed our kayaking gear, gave us a safety debrief and walked us through the basics of the perfect paddle. After scribbling our names on liability waivers, four couples in banana-bright kayaks set out single file, paddling through the cold choppy waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Scaling the shoreline, we were introduced to the geographical formations of the island: coastal bluffs, sharp spiny fault lines and stone versions of Rorschach inkblots that resemble white elephants. We learned that the Channel Islands were home to pygmy mammoths, a variation of the Columbian mammoth species that swam ashore from the mainland some 20,000-40,000 years ago. At four to six feet tall, these mini mammoths freely roamed the island. Today, while these prehistoric creatures are now extinct, their fossils and their legend remain.

Paddling the kayak head-on through unforgiving swells, past dense kelp forests and the occasional curious sea lion poking his head out from beneath the ocean surface, our group followed Kenji into a protected area sheltered from the wind. He took the time to explain a bit about the region’s flora and fauna, before plucking a saffron coloured sea star (a.k.a starfish) from a lava-pocked rock and passed it around. Handling the prickly invertebrate, I paid close attention to its tiny, suction-cupped tube feet used to cling to rocks and trap prey. Sea stars are fascinating little creatures. Not only are they carnivorous, bloodless and eat with their stomachs inside out, but sea stars can regenerate lost limbs like Marvel superheros.

A few tips:

-As with any adventure, there can be some risks associated with sea cave kayaking. It’s best to listen to the guide’s instructions, come equipped with the proper gear .

-The journey begins at Island Packers Dock in Ventura Harbor (about 30 miles south of Santa Barbara) with an hour boat ride from the California mainland to Scorpion Anchorage on Santa Cruz Island. Bring something warm to wear because the boat can be quite chilly.

-Since there are no services on the island, don’t forget to pack everything you need for the day: water, lunch, snacks, sunscreen, hat, sturdy shoes, and a warm change of clothes. Dress in layers and leave the cotton at home. You can leave your valuables (or anything you don’t want to get wet) in a storage box on the island while you kayak. Santa Barbara Adventure Company provides wetsuits, life jackets and paddle jackets specific for kayaking.

-Expect to kayak about three hours, approximately 2.5 miles depending on weather conditions, plus there is time afterwards to explore Santa Cruz Island and hike around.

-To book a sea kayaking tour, visit Santa Barbara Adventure Company

Happy kayaking!

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Balanced atop a wobbly 11-foot board, knees bent, arms wielding a long angled paddle, I took a deep breath and braced myself for the boat wake that rip curled towards me. Not far from the kelp forests, rock cliffs and sandy white shorelines of Newport Beach California, there I was, a student at Stand-Up Paddle Boarding Boot Camp, trying my best to learn a new sport, get some exercise and not topple face first into the freezing cold waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Balanced atop a wobbly 11-foot board, knees bent, arms wielding a long angled paddle, I took a deep breath and braced myself for the boat wake that rip curled towards me. Not far from the kelp forests, rock cliffs and sandy white shorelines of Newport Beach California, there I was, a student at Stand-Up Paddle Boarding Boot Camp, trying my best to learn a new sport, get some exercise and not topple face first into the freezing cold waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Stand Up Paddle Boarding (a.k.a stand-up paddling or just SUP to those in the know) is an emerging activity that is growing in popularity all over the world. Health and fitness experts are boasting about its cross-training benefits, claiming that it helps strengthen the core, improve posture and sculpt the buns, thighs and abs.

Modern SUP began in Hawaii in the 1960’s with the ‘Beach Boys of Waikiki.’ These water sports instructors would use their long boards and outrigger paddles to navigate the ocean and monitor their students learning to surf. In the early 2000s, Hawaiian surfers such as Rick Thomas and Laird Hamilton brought Ku Hoe He’e Nalu, (the Hawaiian word for SUP’ing) to the mainland as a way to train while the surf was down. Since then, this decade-old sport has exploded into the mainstream as a growing recreational activity.

Reid Inouye, publisher of Standup Paddle Magazine, says that interest for the sport has grown by as much as 800%. “We’re still in that first level of people finding out about (the sport). We had a competition in Tahoe five years ago, and seven guys entered. This year, there were 400,” he told a Desert News reporter in last summer.

While the hub of stand up paddling is concentrated along the Californian Coast, there are more and more companies popping up in “non traditional surf areas” all across North America, from New York, where you can paddle the Hudson River, to Nashville, Tennessee, Vail Colorado and the Okanagan Valley in British Colombia.

The Sup Spot an adventure company based in the Newport Beach area of sunny Southern California, is one of many companies offering stand-up paddle boarding lessons across all levels, from beginners who’ve never paddled, to hardcore racers looking to perfect their sprint stroke. Who better to teach a newbie paddler like me than Jodie Nelson, a professional surfer, the Sup Spot owner, and the first woman to paddle a grueling 39.8 miles from Catalina Island to Dana Point. Not only did she raise $125,000 for Breast Cancer awareness but she had a close encounter with a Minke whale that landed her a guest spot on the Ellen Degeneres show.

My hour-long crash course began with the basics: the correct stance and form, to paddling techniques and proper equipment usage.

“A common mistake people make is holding the paddle the wrong way,” explained Jodie. “For a further reach and more efficient stroke, the angle of the paddle should be facing away from you, not towards you,” she continued. “Another common mistake is to have your hands too close together. Keep your hands shoulder-width apart, one hand on the center of the paddle, the other on the T-bar. If you lift your paddle over your head, your arms should be at 90 degrees,” demonstrated Jodie, arms over her head like a sea-dwelling superhero.

Successful stand up paddling is all about balance, so, as I climbed up on the board, I found the center point, kept a wide stance, distributed my weight and slowly crept from the kneeling position to standing upright.

True, there was a little arm flailing and a few “whoas” did escape my lips but I’m happy to report that I didn’t fall in! Instead, I learned that I’m actually quite good at stand-up paddle boarding! Who knew? That said, before I give myself too much credit and quit my job to join the surfer circuit, I must resign to the fact that it’s truly a sport that anyone can do.

“Surfing can take years to master, but with stand up paddle boarding on flat water, people can get up on the board and start enjoy themselves in a matter of minutes. It’s low impact, it’s not intimidating and can be done in almost any body of water around the world by people of any age,” explained Jodie as we skimmed effortlessly across the water’s surface.

“Also, the vantage point from a board is a completely different view from a kayak or canoe,” said Jodie as she explained that in the protected area of Corona Del Mar, not far from Laguna Beach, the turquoise waters are so clear it’s as if you’re on a glass-bottom boat. You can spot brightly-colored orange Garibaldi fish, dolphins and migrating grey whales that swim alongside you. Jodie admits “I’ve seen more wildlife since I started SUP than I ever did all my surfing life!”

Skimming calmly and meditatively along the water, calories burning, arms and quads toning effortlessly, I learned first-hand that SUP is not just a growing hobby among water-sport addicts, it’s also a cool way for tourists to spend a day out on the water and sightsee as they sculpt.

For more information:

The Sup Spot Stand Up Paddling Bootcamp classes are held year round, through all weather conditions. For more information, check out www.supspot.com. Hour-long private lessons are $100, semi private are $75 per person and $65 for groups of three or more. Classes are held in Malibu, Marina Del Rey, Long Beach, Huntington Beach and Newport Harbor.

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